SEALAND HELP TO SAVE THE PLANET

May 9th, 2011

SEALAND HELP TO SAVE THE PLANET

On November 27th last year the Sealand Cessna took off from Goodwood to photograph a unique event on the sea front at nearby Hove in West Sussex. The photography was undertaken on behalf of 350.org which is an International campaign that are building a movement to unite the world around solutions to the climate crisis. The 350 Earth project was the worlds first ever global art project. In over a dozen places across the globe, citizens and artists created massive public art installations. Each art installation was large enough to be seen from space and documented by satellites, ground and aerial photography.

The final event was the event at Hove, where Thom Yorke (the lead singer of Radiohead) assembled a few thousand of his closest friends and biggest fans to brave the cold on England’s coast. Together, they formed the image of the legendary King Canute attempting to hold back the waters.

To find out more about the international campaign follow this link www.350.org

SEALAND CAPTURE SIX CRUISE SHIPS IN PORT AT SOUTHAMPTON

May 9th, 2011

SEALAND CAPTURE SIX CRUISE SHIPS IN PORT AT SOUTHAMPTON

Six cruise ships, including some of the world’s most famous liners were photographed on behalf of Associated British Ports by Sealand when they were all in port in Southampton at the the same time on January 5th.

Cunard’s newest ship Queen Elizabeth and its sister Queen Victoria were there along with P&O Cruises’ Arcadia.

Up to 20,000 passengers arrived in or departed from the city’s four cruise terminals during the course of the day.

The other three ships in port were Fred Olsen’s Balmoral and Black Watch, and Saga Cruises’ Saga Ruby.

Sealand transmitted images electronically direct to the marketing department at Southampton minutes after landing at Goodwood. Time was of the essence as the images were required by National and International News Agencies.

NEW HEART FOR SEALAND CESSNA

May 9th, 2011

NEW HEART FOR SEALAND CESSNA

The Sealand Cessna 172 Skyhawk reached a milestone in it’s life in December. The engine realised the end of it’s permitted life span after 2,400 hours of flight. During the annual maintenance in January a heart transplant was necessary and a new Lycoming direct drive OHC engine replaced the old engine. The new engine was supplied by Nicholson Mclaren Aviation who are closely linked to the manufacture of the famous F1 Race Engines.

SNOW HALTS PROGRESS

May 9th, 2011

SNOW HALTS PROGRESS

The Sealand offices look stunning nestling in the Winter Wonderland that was the South Downs in December. The only downside was the lack of flying which held up progress on several projects. Tess the farm office Spaniel was very stressed about this as is evident by the image . . .

2011 EVENTS PROGRAMME BEGINS

May 9th, 2011

Ladies Day Cheltenham

Sealand specialise in the supply of highly detailed digital images of outdoor events. These images are used by the organisers for a variety of purposes. At the time of writing The Sealand Cessna is just about to depart for The Cheltenham Horse Racing Festival. Commissions have already been confirmed for Badminton Horse Trials, The Epsom Derby and Royal Ascot. The Goodwood “Festival of Speed” and The Goodwood “Revival.”

CONSIDERATIONS WHEN CHOOSING AN AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIER

December 21st, 2009

Aerial photography has a wide range of applications and there are a number of companies offering aerial photographic services. Choosing the right company will not only dictate the quality of the work but will also make the difference between meeting your deadlines, complying with the law and receiving the correct advice and expertise to get the results you require.

One of the most important influences on choosing the supplier is obviously the end product you wish to acquire. Aerial photography is not a homogenous product and there are many variables involved with aerial photography which can influence the end result as well as the cost. Below is a list of some of the types of Aerial Photography available;

  • Oblique Aerial Photography
  • Vertical Photography
  • Survey Photography
  • Event Aerial Photography
  • The end use for the image will also dictate the type of equipment used. For display size photography, Larger than A1 it is important that the quality and detail exists to be able to expand the image up to the required size. Most good companies will still offer a Medium Format Film service as well as a digital service, only in very recent times has the digital equipment begun to rival the quality of film for big enlargements.

    If precision survey photography or vertical photography is required the company must be able to fulfil this requirement with accurate GPS equipment and often with a gyro-stabilised camera mounting system.

    However you choose your supplier, be sure to shop around, make sure you receive the expert advice, a good reputable company will suggest the most appropriate type of photography to fit your budget and brief even if they do not offer the service themselves.

    Beware of casual/part time companies or individuals, they may not have the expertise to advise you or indeed be operating within the bounds of strict air law. A specialist Aerial photography company will own its own aircraft and employ full time qualified pilots which allow the flexibility to react to the prevailing weather conditions and therefore produce the best possible photography.

    A good indication of the extent of a company’s aerial competence is the existence and size of their aerial photographic library. If a company has an extensive library they may also already have an image which will be sufficient and thus reducing your cost as you can merely purchase the library image from them for a smaller fee.

    AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY – OPERATORS CHECKLIST!

    December 21st, 2009

    Many people who enjoy general aviation will have taken a camera up and happily snapped away to take advantage of some alternative views which would not have otherwise been possible. This type of aerial photography perfectly legal and can provide some fantastic images in the right conditions. However, when selling the images or taking a professional photographer with you who will sell the images this becomes commercial aerial photography and there are many considerations which must be taken into account.

    The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) considers these just some of the important questions you should ask yourself before undertaking any flight:

    Why are you taking pictures? Is there a valuable consideration being given for the flight?

  • Is this a private flight? Public Transport Flight? Or Aerial Work? Air Navigation Order 2000, Article 130.
  • Where are you going to fly?

  • Will you be close to a person, vessel, vehicle or structure? Will you be over an assembly of persons? Rule 5 (1) (e) Rules of the Air and Rule 5 (1) (d).
  • Will you be in controlled airspace?

  • Do you need clearance from an Air Traffic Control Unit? Use an up-to-date chart for the relevant area.
  • Will you be close to an Aerodrome?

  • Know the frequency for the aerodrome, make sure they know who you are and what you are doing, consider contacting them before your arrival.
  • How long will you be in the area?

  • Minimise noise nuisance to those on the ground, consider two or three short visits rather than one long one.
  • How many people in the aircraft?

  • The minimum crew should be two, pilot and photography. Consider another person to help lookout and practice safe techniques before the actual photography.
  • Will low flying military aircraft be a possible harzard?

  • Can you avoid their known operating heights? See safety sense leaflet 18A, AIC 107/99 (yellow 345) and UK AIP ENR 1-10-13.
  • How much equipment are you carrying?

  • What is the effect on weight and balance? Will it obstruct the controls or emergency exits? Make sure the photographer is briefed.
  • Will you photograph other aircraft?

  • This is formation flying! See Rule 17 (1) (c).
  • The above list of questions is not a definitive guide to the issues relating to aerial photography but it does highlight many different aspects which must be taken into account. These will clearly vary depending on the type of photography, for example event photography will pose different problems to construction photography or progress photography due to the large gathering of people at outdoor events.